Street art in the form of murals are oft-discussed as being important cultural landmarks, but one art form is continually undervalued when the conversation around art arises – sculptures.

This time-honoured offering to commemorate and celebrate isn’t as bright or as shiny as a painting, but can sometimes be as majestic and even more captivating.

Here are five of our local favourites to venture towards when exploring our wonderful area:

1. André Wallace, Girl on Roller Skates

This gargantuan piece, standing at over six feet tall, sits on the corner of Moreton Street and Vauxhall Bridge Road. Erected as a positive and dynamic reflection of the youth and vitality of urban life, the figure certainly captures the imagination with her windswept locks and look of defiance.


2. Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, Ventilation Tower

You may have spotted this interesting looking piece upon exiting Pimlico station. This beautiful, brutal sculpture doubles up as a functioning ventilation shaft for the underground below. It encapsulates and celebrates London’s industrial side.


3. Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, Head of Invention

With the relocation of the Design Museum to South Kensington, so came another of our favourite sculptures. Once more by the great Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, this human-head-cum-machine is the practical epitome of the Design Museum’s core values.


4. Enzo Plazzotta, Jete

Jete is based on David Wall, known for being the youngest male Principal in the history of The Royal Ballet at only 21 years old. This striking depiction is on the corner of 46-57 Millbank.


5. Alister Bowtell, My Children

A playful sculpture of a young boy hopping a bollard can be found in Duke of York’s Square, Chelsea. It celebrates the Royal Military Asylum which cared for army children and was established on that very spot.